Ceaster

A fort or castle. The word was used of old Roman fortified towns, becoming the suffix in placenames derived from the Latin castra = a fort. It is found in many names today ending in '-chester' or '-caster'.

Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases. .

Look at other dictionaries:

  • ceaster — f (ceastre/ceastra) 1. a city, fort, castle, town; used as a general term, or applied to foreign towns; 1a. 2 used of heaven, heaven; 1b. 2 used of hell, hell; 2. n (ceastres/ ) a city, etc., used of places in England; Exanceaster Exeter; 3. the… …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • ceaster — city …   The Old English to English

  • Hrof's Ceaster — Hrof s Ceaster, s. Rochester 1) (Stadt) …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Acemannes ceaster — f ( ceastre/ ceastra) Bath, Somersetshire; [Akemann s Chester] …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • Acsan ceaster — f ( ceastre/ ceastra) Exeter, Devon …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • Andredes ceaster — f ( ceastre/ ceastra) the Roman station or city of Andred, Pevensey, or Pemsey Castle, Sussex …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • Cealca ceaster — f (ceastre/ceastra) the chalk city; Camden thinks it is Tadcaster, in Yorkshire …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • Dornwara ceaster — f ( ceastre/ ceastra) Dorchester, the chief town of Dorsetshire [the city of the inhabitants of Dorsetshire] …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • Eaxan ceaster — f ( ceastre/ ceastra) Exeter, Devon …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • Exan ceaster — f (ceastre/ceastra) Exeter, Devon …   Old to modern English dictionary

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